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Posts from the ‘Development’ Category

So, you want an app?

September 12th, 2013

Rob Fahrni

A wonderful boquet of flowers.Elia Freedman: “Developing an application and making money at it is very very hard to do. Maybe your idea is the right one, maybe it isn’t. No matter the case, though, there are likely faster ways to validate the idea then writing an app.”

Another great piece on the cost of app development. If you’re thinking about writing an iOS, Android, or other mobile application make sure you do a bit of research before you start. I find most people are absolutely stunned by the cost of app development. Elia’s piece points to some other great articles that point out the how-to’s and the why-for’s of apps development, including a classic Craig Hockenberry Stack Overflow post on the true cost of developing their Twitter client, Twitterrific.

Elia later goes on to say:

Want to proceed anyway? Good for you. Just don’t go forward with blinders on.

Great advice.

Introducing Arrgly

August 17th, 2013

Rob Fahrni

We’ve added a new, silly, little application to the mix. It’s called Arrgly. A few years back we’d created a project to explore REST URL shortening services from Objective-C and Cocoa. The code could shorten a URL using a number of services, like bit.ly, ping.fm(gone), tr.im(gone), and a little white label shortener called YOURLS, as well as a few others.

We have a URL shortening service called f67 that uses YOURLS. It became obvious, after a few years, of starting the browser, logging in, pasting the link, pressing the shorten button, and copying the link back to the paste board on iOS that there had to be a much better way. We resurrected the URL shortening code, ARC‘ified it, and created a project. That project became Arrgly.

Yeah, it’s not attractive, and has a funny name, but it does exactly what we needed. It makes shortening a URL using our YOURLS based shortener as easy as copying a URL, starting Arrgly, and pasting the resulting short link that was placed back on the paste board for us.

It’s available in the App Store and, yes, it’s FREE.

If you decide to use it and would like a new feature or would like to report a bug, get in touch.

P.S. Yes, if you’re a designer and feel like improving Arrgly in exchange for our undying love and credit for the app design, we’re listening. Contact us: support@applecorelabs.com

BUG = (LLVM Optimizer + ASIHTTPRequest + ARC)

May 29th, 2012

Rob Fahrni

I’ve been working on a project that makes use of ASIHTTPRequest for my REST needs. It’s been great, I’m a big fan of it.

When I started distributing my build to BETA users we noticed it would start and we’d have an empty screen. Huh? That’s not what was supposed to happen. It should’ve started and made a network request, instead it just stares back at you.

I spent quite a long time trying to figure out what was going on. At first I thought it was some weird TestFlight bug, but nothing could be further from the truth, TestFlight is a rock solid service. I finally posted a question to Stack Overflow, I was desperate. Then it hit me.

This has nothing to do with TestFlight and it only happens with the release build. No network activity, release build, using ASIHTTPRequest, and this is my first project built using LLVM. Ok, that gave me a much better Google search string. Off we went!

The Bug

Watch out! It's a blog fly!
It turns out to be a combination of things; LLVM Optimizer + ASIHTTPRequest + ARC, is the cause of my grief. Luckily I’m not the only person that’s discovered this problem and it’s documented on Stack Overflow as well as the ASIHTTPRequest Google group.

The Bottom Line

If you are using Apple’s LLVM compiler, ASIHTTPRequest, ARC, and building for release, or archive, make sure you follow the instructions outlined in the answer for the Stack Overflow post or the ASIHTTPReqeust Google group.